Contact

Sergiy Libert, M.S., Ph.D.

Assistant Professor

Biomedical Sciences

T3-006 VRT

Phone: (607)-253-3082

Fax: (607)-253-3578 

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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Principle Investigator, Dr. Sergiy Libert (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.). I am a physicist by training and obtained my Master’s degree in physics from Clarkson University, NY. After becoming interested in genetic control of lifespan I obtained a Ph.D. in Cell and Molecular Biology from Baylor College of Medicine, TX. I continued studying age-associated protein SIRT1 while a post-doctoral fellowship at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. In my laboratory at Cornell I continue studying genetics of aging using model organisms.

 

Research Assistant, Adam Francisco (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)

 

Graduate Student (BBS), Justin Nicholatos (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.). My project’s focus is on the potential of sirtuin 6 (SIRT6) as a therapeutic target for Parkinson’s disease. SIRT6 is an enzyme that regulates cellular survival, inflammation, and longevity. Our data suggests that SIRT6 plays a role in the survival of neurons affected in Parkinson’s. A second part of my project is studying the phenomena of why tobacco users have a greatly reduced risk of developing Parkinson’s. Nicotine is a component of tobacco that has been shown to possess neuroprotective properties. Our data suggests that nicotine's neuroprotective effects are partially mediated through SIRT6.

 

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Graduate Student (BBS), Timothy Robinette (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.). 
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Following my Master’s Degree, I plan to pursue my Ph.D. in an aging related field to prepare for a career in academia.

Undergraduate (Biology, Cell Molecular), Fraz Lugay (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.) Assistant to Justin Nicholatos, I perform various cell culture and neuronal mouse experiments to expand on Justin's hypothesis on the connection between SIRT6 and the protective effects of nicotine from the development of Parkinson's Disease. Long term, I am interested in going to Medical and/or Dental School and pursuing research in clinical and laboratory settings.

 

 

 

 

 

 Alumni

 

Undergraduate student, Sachin Raviteja Rudraraju (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)

 

Summer student, Ms. Soo Yeon (Nancy) Kim (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.). I am a student attending Korea International School located in South Korea. For the summer of 2013, I was selected to take a part in the Research Apprenticeship in Biology Program at the Cornell Summer College. I have conducted projects titled Effect of Bacterial Metabolic By-products on Bacterial Logistic Curve Change, Hygienic Improvement of Animal Cages using Bacterial Metabolic Waste and Study for Control of Cancer Cells Using siRNA Technology . I am currently studying the mechanism of transcriptional control of SIRT6 in mammalian cell cultures and I am interested in conducting cancer biology related research in the future.

 

Undergraduate student, Susannah Oberly (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
 

Alexander Michael Arbital (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)

 

Graduate Student (BMCB), Michael Platov (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)

I graduated with an MS in 2016 having piloted a multidisciplinary project aimed at discovering novel aging factors through comparative analysis of tissues from short-lived and long-lived dog breeds. I collected and evaluated expression data both from RNA-seq analysis of fixed canine brains, as well as qPCR on RNA extracts from primary canine dermal fibroblasts. At present, I have amassed a collection of fibroblasts from over 100 unique donors, spanning a wide range of breeds. The culmination of this project was the discovery of a putative role for the TRIM44 protein in increased cancer incidence through the Akt-mTOR axis.

Secondary research projects included support for elucidating the role of MTCH2 in lipid homeostasis, as well as the mechanism of Sirt6-knockout-mediated neuroprotection in an MPTP-model of Parkinson’s disease.

During my tenure I was glad to have been a mentor to multiple undergraduate researchers, as well as presenting at numerous scientific conventions, both university-based and abroad, including the Molecular Mechanisms of Aging meeting at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory.

 My current career interests have migrated exclusively to the realm of data analysis, where I am interested in factor/cluster analysis, supervised machine learning, and the education thereof to the scientific community.

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